Month: March 2019

2018 Report: Lake Superior Lakewide Management and Action Plan

Under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA), the governments of Canada and the United States have committed to restore and maintain the physical, biological, and chemical integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes.

The binational annual report on the state of Lake Superior is now available. The report concludes  that the overall ecological condition of Lake Superior is good with native fish species (e.g. Lake Trout) still dominating the top of the food chain, as well as a healthy lower food web. Lake Superior also remains a source of safe, high-quality drinking water.

However, the report also noted some of the emerging challenges and stressors for the lake. These challenges include: the threat of aquatic invasive species, the impacts of climate change, reduced habitat connectivity between the tributaries and the Lake itself, and the emerging concern over microplastics. 

The complete 2018 LaMP Annual Report is available here.

Information on the state of the other Great Lakes is also available.


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Ecological Restoration Webinar – March 28th

Register Here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6929246920652893187

Thursday, March 28th, 2019, 11:00 AM to 12 NOON EDT

Interagency Ecological Restoration Quality Committee Webinar Series
About the Webinar

Upon graduation from Purdue University in 1977, Guy Meadows joined the faculty of the University of Michigan, College of Engineering, where he served as Professor of Physical Oceanography for 35 years within the departments of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences and Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. During his tenure, he served the College and University as Director of the Ocean Engineering Laboratory, Director of the Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research (NOAA, Joint Institute), Director of the Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories and founding Academic Director of the M-STEM Academy. He joined Michigan Tech in June of 2012, to help establish the new Great Lakes Research Center as its founding director. His primary goal is to blend scientific understanding and technological advancements into environmentally sound engineering solutions for the marine environment. 

Dr. Richard K. (Dick) Norton is a professor in the urban and regional planning program at the University of Michigan. Both a planner and a lawyer, he has studied state and local efforts to manage coastal shoreland areas for more than 20 years. For most of that time he has focused on shoreland management along Michigan’s Great Lakes. Collaborating extensively with colleagues like Dr. Guy Meadows, his work brings together expertise in shoreline dynamics, resource ecology, law, and land use planning. For this webinar, Dr. Norton will discuss the legal debates surrounding the public management and use of privately owned shoreland properties along the Great Lakes, and planning processes that small coastal localities can employ to effectively manage their shoreland areas, especially for hazard mitigation.

The Interagency Ecological Restoration Quality Committee hosts monthly Webinars in an effort to bring restoration practitioners from across the country together to present and discuss the innovations aimed at improving the quality of ecological restoration data. Presentations are approximately 45 minutes in length, followed by an open discussion for the remainder of the hour. 

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Single-Use Plastics Ban: Ontario Seeks Input


Shared Waters

Lake Superior’s waters move freely and are shared by Canadians and Americans alike; therefore, residents on Superior’s U.S. side might be interested in learning about something that is gaining considerable interest across the lake, in Canada.

Would a ban on single-use plastics be effective in reducing plastic waste?”

In a recently released discussion paper entitled Reducing Litter and Waste in our Communities, the Ontario government asks, “Would a ban on single-use plastics be effective in reducing plastic waste?” The paper contends that 10,000 tonnes of plastic debris enter the Great Lakes each year, and notes that “cleaning up our lakes and rivers after they have been polluted is not a sustainable solution. . . . Consistent, coordinated action is needed to prevent plastic from ending up in waterways . . . .”



The Paper Broaches the Idea of Groundbreaking, Large-scale Societal Change

Participants in shoreline cleanups would probably agree, knowing that cleaning up, time after time, becomes an endless cycle, superficial at best. The government’s discussion paper says Ontario will support shoreline cleanups, but it is most noteworthy for its emphasis on prevention and taking action before plastic enters the water. The paper broaches the idea of banning single-use plastics, a groundbreaking change that would impact many aspects of society in the province.

The paper also examines a wide range of waste management approaches including the following:

  • preventing and reducing litter
  • making producers responsible for their waste
  • diverting food and organic waste
  • increasing the effectiveness of composting programs
  • reducing plastic waste to landfills and waterways.

A recent province-wide phone-in program, which was run by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, featured an interview with a representative of the plastic industry and sought the opinions of Ontario residents about the ban on single-use plastics. The industry representative did not support the ban. The vast majority of callers, from across the entire province, did.


Plastic nurdles accumulated amongst natural beach debris, Nipigon Bay, Lake Superior, 2017. (Photo: infosuperior.com)

Input Welcomed

The Province of Ontario welcomes input on the discussion paper. 

Other Links:


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Film, Podcast Explore Isle Royale Wolf Situation

A Brian Kaufman film, made in 2015, which was recently posted in the Detroit Free Press, puts forward the voices of those people both for, and against, human intervention in the Isle Royale wolf/moose equation. Click here to view the film (be sure to “unmute” the film, lower left on new page).

The voices of those both for and against human intervention


The Detroit Free Press newspaper (online version), which often covers Great Lakes issues, explores the topic of wolves and Isle Royale in a film recently posted to its site. The March 13th Free Press edition includes an award winning 37 min video by Brian Kaufman. In summer 2015 Kaufman spent several weeks on Isle Royale hiking and filming. The film was first shown to a sold-out crowd at the Detroit Film Festival in 2016, and it has won two awards.

In addition to Isle Royale National Park Superintendent Phyllis Green, several wolf and ecological experts are interviewed including John Vucetich of Houghton’s Michigan Technological University (MTU), Rolf Peterson, also of MTU, his wife Carolyn Peterson, listed as wolf and moose “research volunteer” and Marvin Robinson of the Sierra Club. 

In essence, the film puts forward the voices of those people both for, and against, human intervention in the Isle Royale wolf/moose equation. On both sides, these voices are very passionate and the film is an excellent means of exploring the topic of human “interventions” in the natural world.

[A recent Infosuperior article about caribou, linked below, also has some valuable thoughts about interventions. The article notes that intervention for economic gain is often accepted, while intervention to assist rehabilitation of a specific species, or ecosystem, may be rejected.]


Podcast questions whether interventions are done for wolves, or people


Listen to CBC’s “Ideas” episode “Guardians vs. Gardeners”

A thought provoking 55 min podcast by Brad Badelt on the CBC radio program “Ideas” also takes an in-depth look at the topic of wolves and Isle Royale. Entitled “Guardians vs. Gardeners,” the audio documentary explores the philosophy behind relocating wolves to Isle Royale. The podcast details the introduction of wolves to Lake Superior’s largest island decades ago, examines a related National Geographic article and raises questions about inbreeding. The podcast also questions whether interventions are done for the wolves and the ecosystem, or for ourselves. Leading environmental thinkers and wolf experts have their say.


Four wolves were moved from Wawa, Ontario to Isle Royale this winter


The podcast and film were posted just as another Isle Royale wolf relocation was completed this winter. Four wolves were recently moved to Isle Royale and an excellent CBC article written by Gord Ellis provides an overview of this effort.

Check out the CBC article here.

The wolves are from the Wawa, Ontario area on the Canadian side of Lake Superior. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and the U.S National Parks Service cooperated to move the wolves. A representative of Michipicoten First Nation, near Wawa, participated in the capture effort.

A similar effort last year relocated four Minnesota wolves to Isle Royale but only two of these wolves remain on the island. This is in addition to two other wolves (a father and daughter) which remain from an earlier, larger population. In short, four wolves were on Isle Royale before this winter’s relocation effort was carried out. The Canadian wolves double the population, which now stands at eight. 

According to the CBC article, the additional wolves will increase genetic diversity and will also assist in controlling the moose population (approximately 1500 animals).


Links:

March 4, 2019 Infosuperior Article: Lake Superior’s Iconic Caribou Population: Back from the Brink?

March 15th, 2019 MPR News Story – Take Wolves Off the Endangered Species List?


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For Health and Habitat: Rescuing the Great Lakes

The Great Lakes Areas of Concern program has helped clean up rivers, restore wetlands, and boost economies — but there’s still a long way to go.

March 6, 2019 by Peter Essick

The Ford River Rouge Complex in Michigan was once the largest integrated factory in the world. Like other Great Lakes waterways in industrialized areas, the nearby Rouge River is now heavily polluted.  All photos by Peter Essick for Undark
 

Restoration of the Great Lakes began unofficially in 1969, after the notoriously polluted Cuyahoga River caught fire in Cleveland, near where it empties into Lake Erie. Nearly two decades later, in 1987, the U.S. and Canada signed an agreement creating the Great Lakes Areas of Concern program, which identified 43 Great Lakes watersheds that were most in need of environmental restoration. It also created a process whereby an area can be delisted once its environmental quality has improved.


The Environmental Protection Agency tracks the status of various Areas of Concern. Click the map to zoom or visit the AOC website to learn more.

In 2010, the Obama administration launched the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), which, among other things, provides funds for the Areas of Concern program so that all of the areas left in the U.S. can eventually be delisted. Last year, President Trump called for massive cuts to the GLRI, but Congress fully funded it at $300 million, in a bipartisan effort.

This bipartisan support stems from the economic benefits of environmental restoration. A study by a team of economists released last fall found that every dollar invested in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative brings more than $3 in additional economic benefits across the region. “It is no longer the economy versus the environment,” said Jill Jedlicka, executive director of Buffalo Niagara Waterkeeper, a Western New York nonprofit focused on protecting and restoring the Niagara River watershed. “You cannot have a healthy economy without a healthy environment.”

The Areas of Concern program is a large-scale environmental project carried out largely by local communities — which may account for its longevity and effectiveness. State and local officials, as well as environmental organizations and community groups, work to restore native vegetation, clean up rivers and streams, and enjoy nature in the process. There is still much work to be done, they say, but water quality in the Great Lakes region has improved significantly since the Cuyahoga River fire shocked the region into action.

These photographs were supported by a grant from the National Geographic Society.


Recovering the Wetlands

There are more than half a million acres of coastal wetlands in the Great Lakes Basin, with roughly 70 percent located in the United States, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. This is less than half of the region’s historical wetlands expanse.

Only about 5 percent of Lake Erie’s coastal marshes remain along its western shores. One sits beside the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station. Each year, Lake Erie wetlands provide an estimated $10,500 per acre in total economic value.


Friends Richard Darval (left) and Damarcus Walters enjoy a summer evening in a restored wetland that was once the site of an abandoned railroad track. GLRI funding contributed to this restoration in Michigan’s St. Clair River Area of Concern.


Rachael Fuller, 11, participates in an event for young duck hunters at the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge in Ohio. Ducks Unlimited has received more than $35 million from the GLRI to conserve thousands of acres, including wetlands in the refuge.

Nurturing Native Species

Close to 200 invasive and non-native species have threatened the historic ecosystem of the Great Lakes region. According to a 2018 progress report, some 135,000 aquatic and terrestrial acres have been brought under control, but far more work remains.

Opened in 1959, the St. Lawrence Seaway connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. The ballast water from ships has introduced many invasive species, with economic consequences for the region

Forestry technician Angelo Johnson is part of a GLRI-funded initiative to plant 1,200 trees in Akwesasne, a Native community located along New York’s border with Canada, where about 70 percent of the trees are being impacted by the emerald ash borer. Johnson learned to make these everyday black ash baskets from his uncle.


Sierra Taliaferro removes invasive garlic mustard along the banks of the Milwaukee River. Taliaferro volunteers with a community group that aims to bring neighbors and neighborhoods together to celebrate the park.
Tim DePriest, of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, reestablishes native submerged aquatic vegetation by planting shoots by hand. The Niagara River was impacted by past mining and dredge spoil disposal.

Balancing Power Needs

While the immense water resources of the region have been a boon for power-production infrastructure, dams and electricity generating facilities have taken their toll on the Great Lakes, robbing marshlands of nourishing flows, impacting fish stocks, and occupying shoreline ripe for recreation. Bit by bit, balance is being restored.


As water was diverted for power plants, this marsh near Niagara Falls became drier and overgrown with cattail. As part of a restoration effort, channels were dug to create open water for migratory waterfowl.


The Gorge Dam on the Cuyahoga River in Ohio. Several tons of contaminated sediment have accumulated behind the dam for more than a century, but it is slated for removal — at a cost of about $70 million.


Eric Sunday, Jr. (left) and Aaron Adams fish for sturgeon on the St. Lawrence River. Sturgeon face a number of threats, including dams, but the local Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe has received GLRI grants to explore restoration of viable spawning habitat.


Boaters enjoy a fall evening in Milwaukee’s historic Third Ward. Within the Milwaukee Estuary Area of Concern, obsolete dams and toxic sediments were removed and a river walk was built, stretching more than 20 blocks.

Remediating Pollution

Poisoned soil, polluted water, and other fallout from decades of inadequately regulated industrial activity had left vast swaths of the Great Lakes basin a veritable wasteland. But 30 years after the Areas of Concern program launched, signs of recovery are easy to spot — even along the northern Ohio river that became the poster child for Great Lakes blight a half-century ago.


This section of Wisconsin’s Sheboygan River was dredged to remove hazardous chemicals. New development arrived and now Sheboygan has a thriving “blue economy.” Some locals are starting to complain about gentrification and the high cost of new housing.


High school student Madison Kenyon at a community clean-up, removing trash along the Ottawa River in Toledo, Ohio.


Joel Perez grew up near Indiana’s Grand Calumet River, which was once heavily polluted with industrial waste. As a biologist with the Nature Conservancy, he plants native hard stem bulrushes to help restore a nearby nature preserve.
Remediation of the Buffalo River contributed to the waterfront’s economic revitalization. Several old abandoned grain elevators have been repurposed into the Buffalo RiverWorks, a waterfront entertainment complex.


This nesting box is part of a study monitoring tree swallows for signs of change following the removal of contaminated sediments from the Rouge River. These birds make good indicator species because they eat insects from the river.


The Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Ohio.

National Geographic photographer Peter Essick is a specialist in environmental themes documenting human impacts of development on the natural landscape. He has photographed stories on climate change, freshwater, high-tech trash, nuclear waste, drought, and ecosystem restoration, and his images have been featured in Time magazine’s “Great Images of the 20th Century” and in “100 Best Photographs of National Geographic.”

This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article.

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Registration Now Open for 2019 Great Lakes Public Forum


Canada and U.S. convene for public forum as part of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement

Registration is now open for the 2019 Great Lakes Public Forum. Every three years, parties from both the Canadian and U.S. sides of the Great Lakes must, as part of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, hold a public forum to provide updates on progress towards protecting and restoring the waters of the Great Lakes. The 2019 Great Lakes Public Forum, organized by the Environmental Protection Agency and Environment and Climate Change Canada, will be held from Monday, June 17 to Wednesday, June 19 at the Hilton Milwaukee City Center hotel in Milwaukee, WI.


For More information on registration and accommodations Click Here


In 2017, the Governments of Canada and the U.S. described the overall state of the Great Lakes as “Fair and Unchanging,” based on 9 indicators and 44 sub-indicators, as reported on Binational.net. The 2019 forum will cover what is going to be prioritized in the next three years alongside what has been accomplished to date. Expect to hear about and discuss each of the 10 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement Annexes:

More Information will be posted to Binational.net as it becomes available


Registration ends Friday, May 31, 2019. To register now Click Here.


Links:

Infosuperior Livestream of the 2016 Great Lakes Public Forum


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Lake Superior’s Iconic Caribou Population: Back From the Brink?

A caribou on Lake Superior’s Michipicoten Island. This photo was taken by Christian Schroeder before a dramatic decline in the caribou population after wolves crossed to the island by ice in 2014.

THANK YOU FROM INFOSUPERIOR

Thank you to Gord Eason, Leo Lepiano and Christian Schroeder for information provided in this article. Gord, Leo and Christian are deeply invested in preserving the Lake Superior caribou population. All have close ties to the Wawa area and to Michipicoten Island.


CONSERVATION ACTION 2017–2018

In 2014, ice allowed wolf passage from the mainland to islands where most of Lake Superior’s caribou population is centered. The Michipicoten caribou population was decimated by the wolves; due to this alarming population drop, Michipicoten First Nation, near Wawa, Ontario, raised concerns that the Lake Superior caribou population was in imminent danger of disappearing entirely.

Ruling out the option to hunt and eliminate every wolf on Michipicoten, which was deemed too difficult (if not impossible) to accomplish, the band approached the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to take action. The band then cooperated with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to move the caribou to the Slate Islands (the Slates) and Caribou Island during winter 201718.

Ice cover sufficient to allow travel by wolves to the Slates is sporadic. Caribou Island is even more remote and has no wolf population. The idea behind relocating these caribou was, in effect, like taking out an insurance policy against elimination of the entire population. By placing caribou on these islands, it was hoped that populations would recover, eventually to the extent that some of the caribou could be moved back to Michipicoten and other locations.

Action began last winter when several caribou were moved from Michipicoten Island to the Slates and Caribou Island, where wolf predation would be less likely. In total, 15 animals were successfully moved by helicopter.

  • Michipicoten Island is located some 13 km/8 mi. offshore in the Wawa, Ontario area
  • The Slate Islands are located some 12 km/ 7 mi. offshore from Terrace Bay, Ontario
  • Caribou Island is located due south of Michipicoten Island, 72 km/44 mi. north of the Michigan mainland and 60 km/37 mi. south of the Canadian mainland (not to be confused with the much smaller Caribou Island in Thunder Bay, Ontario).

Ten caribou were moved to the Slate Islands but one animal died, leaving nine animals alive; eight of these were cows (female) and one was a bull (male). At the time of transfer, there were thought to be one to four bulls still inhabiting the Slates.

Six caribou, two of which were bulls, were transferred to Caribou Island.


ONE YEAR AFTER THIS CARIBOU CONSERVATION EFFORT, WHAT IS THE STATUS OF THESE ANIMALS?


The Slate Islands

All eight of the cows moved to the Slates were radio collared. Ongoing monitoring indicates that they are all alive. The status of the one bull caribou is not known as this animal was not radio collared. There is also uncertainty about the status of wolves because an ice bridge connected the Slates to the mainland for several weeks this winter, and it is not clear whether wolves have again crossed to this island group.

Caribou Island

The prevailing situation on Caribou Island is similar to that on the Slates. Radio collar monitoring of the four cows indicates that they are all alive. The two bulls are not collared and, therefore, their status is not known.


Caribou move
The upright ears on this male caribou provide a good sign as the animal is moved from Michipicoten Island to Caribou Island in early March, 2018. Photo: Christian Schroeder

CRITICAL NEXT STEPS


Gord, Leo and Christian are very interested in conserving Lake Superior’s caribou population. To ensure the caribou population is not eliminated and to increase population size and stability, they lay out the following steps:

  • Verify the status of bulls on both the Slates and Caribou Island; without male animals, they point out, populations will cease to exist in these areas (they will be “functionally extirpated”). It is also important to have more than one bull for genetic diversity (reducing breeding with half siblings or father).
  • Move bulls to the Slates and Caribou Island if necessary.
  • Conduct a high quality aerial survey of caribou numbers on the Canadian North Shore mainland adjacent to Lake Superior. The only source of additional Lake Superior area caribou is the mainland and such a survey will provide high confidence results for this population through actual animal sightings. (A 2015 caribou survey estimated mainland caribou numbers at over 50 animals, but confidence in this survey is low since no caribou were actually sighted, rather, results were based upon caribou “sign.”)
  • If the caribou population on the North Shore of Lake Superior is critically low (<20), transport these animals in order to preserve their genetics for future restoration .
  • Ensure Michipicoten Island is wolf-free, in order to receive caribou from the North Shore mainland, if necessary. Current estimates put the Michipicoten wolf population at 10 to 12 animals.
  • Develop a co-management structure for long-term Lake Superior caribou conservation. This plan should be a cooperative effort among citizens, First Nations, interested municipalities, interested organizations and provincial agencies.

Slate Islands Caribou, 2008
A caribou on Lake Superior’s Slate Islands, 2008. Photo: Brian McLaren

“WE NEED TO ASSERT THE PRIMACY OF CHOICE.”

– Leo Lepiano

Some people may question the importance of Lake Superior caribou conservation. Gord, Leo and Christian point out that a large part of the Canadian Lake Superior mainland is a protected area, from the tip of Thunder Cape in the west (Sleeping Giant Provincial Park), through the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area, eastward to Pukaskwa Nation Park and on to Lake Superior Provincial Park (now with additions south of Montreal River Harbour). As such, they point out, there is minimal conflict with logging or other activities, unlike other areas of caribou habitat.

Additionally, they mention that Lake Superior used to be in the very core of continental caribou range, which included the south side of the lake and places like Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The three posit that if we cannot successfully preserve this one iconic animal population (centred on a lake shared by two very wealthy countries), there is certainly little hope of preserving other endangered plants and animals in more remote, much less affluent, parts of the world.


caribou release
This bull caribou moved from Michipicoten Island to Caribou Island bounds for freedom upon release, early March, 2018. Photo: Christian Schroeder

“THE PROCESS OF EXTINCTION IS THE ELIMINATION OF INDIVIDUAL POPULATIONS.”

– Gord Eason

Some might say ice cover extending to Lake Superior islands comes and goes, as do wolves, and that humans shouldn’t intervene in this situation. Gord, Leo and Christian respond to this by noting the massive human interventions, some on a landscape scale, undertaken for economic gain throughout Northwestern Ontario. Their position is that human intervention to help caribou is insignificant in comparison and every bit as valid as intervention for economic gain.


HOW ICE COVER IMPACTED THE SLATE ISLANDS AND MICHIPICOTEN ISLAND


Lake Superior Ice Cover

Just before this article was posted (February 27th), Lake Superior ice cover stood at about 85%. Ice cover has not been so extensive since 2014 when maximum Lake Superior ice cover stood at about 96% and ice cover extended from the Canadian shore to both the Slate Islands and to Michipicoten Island. As a result, three or four wolves crossed to Michipicoten Island. By 2017, the Michipicoten wolf population had increased to about 20 animals. A pair of wolves also crossed to the Slates, as has happened in each of the two previous decades.

The Slate Islands

The 2014 introduction of wolves to the Slate Islands meant that by 2017, all female caribou had been eliminated. Only a few male caribou remained, and without females, the caribou population was functionally extirpated. The crash in the caribou population also brought about a corresponding crash in the wolf population. In 201718, when action (outlined above) was taken to address the precipitous decline in Lake Superior caribou numbers, no wolves could be found on the Slates.

Michipicoten Island

On Michipicoten Island, in winter 2014, the caribou population was projected to be over 900. After wolves crossed to the island in that same year, the population was quickly reduced to only several animals, both male and female, by winter 2018. There have been no further sightings of caribou on Michipicoten Island since March 2018.


Young caribou Slates, 2008
A young caribou on the Slate Islands, 2008. Photo: Brian McLaren

THE LONGER TERM


Gord, Leo and Christian point out that while the Lake Superior caribou population was within a hair’s breadth of being entirely eliminated during the winter of 2017–18; this should by no means mark the end of efforts aimed at caribou preservation. A life ring may have been thrown to this population but this is merely a stop-gap measure. All three maintain that vigilance and ongoing action are needed to prevent extirpation, even while concurrently developing a long-term plan and broader cooperation. Additionally, and perhaps most importantly, all three maintain that success is possible.


LINKS:

PREVIOUS INFOSUPERIOR CARIBOU ARTICLES


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Miigwech Josephine Mandamin: A Water Walker’s Legacy

Josephine Biidasige Mandamin (far left) with other participants of the 2017 Great Lakes Water Walk at the Toronto Waterfront. Photo from the Great Lakes Water Walk Facebook Page.

Nokomis (Grandmother) Josephine Biidasige Mandamin, of Wiikwemkoong Unceeded Territory, dedicated her life to speaking for the Great Lakes and was an influential teacher and advocate for the Earth’s water. The impact of her conservation and advocacy work will live on for future generations.

In 2003, she began the Mother Earth Water Walkers with another Grandmother. Starting with Lake Superior, they walked the perimeter of each of the Great Lakes and the Saint Lawrence seaway and were joined by many along the way. The Mother Earth Water Walks inspired others, like Mary Anne Caibaiosai, to start their own water walks and spurred the Junior Water Walkers.


Nokomis Josephine Mandamin speaks at the Great Lakes Commons Gathering.
Posted on Youtube by OnTheCommons.


In 2006, Josephine Mandamin was on the committee for the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. She was a prominent leader and contributor to the Great Lakes Guardians’ Council and Chief Commissioner of the Anishinabek Nation Women’s Water Commission. In 2016 she was a recipient of the Lieutenant Governor’s Ontario Heritage award for her years of conservation work.


Remembered by Many

Indigenous Environmental Network: With Heavy Hearts We Mourn the Loss of Beloved Grandmother Josephine Mandamin

Ontario Native Women’s Association: The Ontario Native Women’s Association Honours the Legacy of Biidasige Josephine Mandamin

Water Docs: She Walked the Talk: Farewell to Water Warrior Grandmother Josephine Mandamin

Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs: Statement on the Passing of Grandmother Josephine Mandamin

Winnipeg Free Press: ‘Water Walker’ Remembered as Protector

Ontario Public Service Union: OPSEU mourns the passing of Grandmother Water Walker Josephine Mandamin

CBC Obituary: Josephine Mandamin, water activist who walked 17,000 km around the Great Lakes, dies at 77

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Climate Disruption Session at Lakehead University


The Lakehead University Office of Sustainability is hosting a free student-friendly session about climate change on Wednesday, March 13th, from 2:00pm until 6:00pm. The event will take place on campus at The Study Coffeehouse. The goal of the session is to facilitate conversation about the anthropogenic disruption of climate processes and generate involvement in climate-change preparedness.

Research, Protest, Advocacy and a Movie

The opening elevator-pitch session will highlight research at Lakehead that focuses on climate change. From 2:00pm until 3:00pm, participants will describe their research and why it’s important, in three minutes or less. Attendees will then have the opportunity to ask questions.

In the second portion, Protest Pedagogy, learn how protest is an important educational tool and why it doesn’t deserve the negative connotation that many associate with the term.

Next, things get personal with some pointed information about how Lakehead University is contributing to climate destabilization through professors’ pension plan investments in fossil fuel stocks. A Lakehead student group, Fossil Free Lakehead, will make the case for Lakehead University to divest from fossil fuel stocks.

Later on, enjoy pizza and a screening of the critically acclaimed film Anthropocene: The Human Epoch.


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