Recent Report on Evaporation in the Great Lakes and its Implications
Posted on: February 25, 2014
Figure 1: Four components of the monthly Lake Superior water balance, beginning with the month of June, which is the typical start of the “evaporation season.” Each component is shown as a flux of water in units of inches per month (left; spread out over the surface area of Lake Superior), as well as in equivalent “number of Niagara Falls” (right). Note, in particular, the strong seasonal variation in evaporation.
Figure 1: Four components of the monthly Lake Superior water balance, beginning with the month of June, which is the typical start of the “evaporation season.” Each component is shown as a flux of water in units of inches per month (left; spread out over the surface area of Lake Superior), as well as in equivalent “number of Niagara Falls” (right). Note, in particular, the strong seasonal variation in evaporation.

A new report released by the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA) Centre discusses and details evaporation in the Great Lakes and its implications on water levels. To access the report, please click on the above photo.

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