Month: January 2018

Wisconsin’s Sturgeon Success Story

“Lake sturgeon, an ancient fish native to the Great Lakes region, can grow to be more than six feet long, 200 pounds and live more than 100 years.”

University of Wisconsin – Madison Aquatic Sciences Centre has put together a fascinating site about a fascinating fish – sturgeon. The way the website puts it, the site outlines “Wisconsin’s love affair with an ancient fish.” In addition to some captivating photos, the site provides an array of information with an emphasis on saving Wisconsin’s sturgeon population.

Interesting Sturgeon Facts from the University of Wisconsin – Madison Aquatic Sciences Centre sturgeon site:

  • There are 27 species of sturgeon worldwide
  • Lake sturgeon are native to the Mississippi, Great Lakes and Hudson Bay watersheds.
  • Lake sturgeon are native to the Mississippi, Great Lakes and Hudson Bay watersheds.
  • The Menominee Indians have been People of the Sturgeon for thousands of years and are among the oldest inhabitants of Wisconsin.
  • At one point fifteen train cars of Atlantic sturgeon caviar were sent to New York City every day
  • Dams blocking sturgeon runs proved to be a great threat to sturgeon populations
  • A statewide moratorium on sturgeon fishing went into effect in Wisconsin in 1915 in an an attempt to save the species.
  • Wisconsin Sturgeon populations have rebounded, especially in Lake Winnebego.

Find out more at the U of W – Madison Aquatic Sciences Centre sturgeon website!

Sturgeon rehabilitation efforts on Lake Superior are also making substantial progress, as noted in the following links:

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Wisconsin “Great Waters” Photo Contest

Check out this fun 5 minute video of winning photos from the 2017 “Great Waters” contest.

Photos

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) is seeking Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and Mississippi River photos for submission in their “Great Waters” photo contest.

WDNR is looking for:

  • beautiful shorelines;
  • kids and adults enjoying the lakes and river;
  • cultural and historical features; and
  • lake/river stewardship activities.

Photos in all seasons are needed. Winning photos will be used in the annual “Wisconsin’s Great Waters” calendar and in other DNR publications, presentations, websites and displays.

Photo submission deadline is February 1. Limit three photos per photographer.

Links:

Writing

Help WDNR get the word out about how great Wisconsin’s Great Waters are. Share your favorite writings. You may find your words in our calendar, publications, presentations and displays. (Note: Calendar space limit is about 180 words.) Email your writing submissions by February 1 to:

Please include your name, address, phone number and email address.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Public Information Sessions on Proposed Thunder Bay Smelter

Two public sessions will provide opportunity for anyone interested in learning about the potential construction and operation of a ferrochrome production facility, or smelter, in the Thunder Bay area. Public information session details follow below:

  • 6 to 8 p.m., Mon., Jan. 15, Fort William First Nation Community Centre, 400 Anemki Drive, Fort William First Nation
  • 7 to 9 p.m., Wed., Jan. 17, Ballroom 1, Valhalla Inn, 1 Valhalla Inn Rd., Thunder Bay.

The sessions are hosted by Fort William First Nation and the Thunder Bay Economic Development Commission and will address the potential to process ore mined by Noront Resources in the “Ring of Fire” area, a  mining district in the James Bay Lowlands, located some 500 km./311 mi. northeast of Thunder Bay. Noront acquires, explores and develops mineral properties with a focus on the Ring of Fire.

Ferrochrome is an alloy of iron and aluminum produced through a high temperature process called carbothermic reaction. The Ring of Fire is considered one of the largest mining reserves in Ontario and proponents cite massive economic potential for up to a hundred years, if mining goes ahead. The Ring of Fire project has seen extensive media coverage over many years, including a focus on potential economic benefits, environmental and social concerns, impacts on First Nations and transportation to and from the remote Ring of Fire area.

Related:

 

 

 

 

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Ice: Complex Change Over Time

Lake Superior Historical Ice Cover.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides a graphic animation of Lake Superior ice cover, every year since 1973. Click anywhere on the above graphic to proceed to NOAA’s animation.

Animating Ice Cover

Ice cover is a common topic of conversation for those living near Lake Superior in winter, just as water levels are a common topic in summer. Blanket statements about reduced or increased ice cover may over-simplify the situation on Superior because the long-term trend is actually quite complex.

The Infosuperior site includes a wealth of raw Lake Superior environmental data (water levels, water temperature, historical water temperature, real-time river flow to the lake, bathymetry, etc), including a graphic representation of ice cover. The graphic illustrates changing conditions over time with an image depicting ice coverage for each winter since 1973. The animated data is provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Links:

Change Over Time

Ice cover for the winter of 2017 stood at about 25%. How does this compare with previous years? According to NOAA’s animation, the number of years with very low ice cover, is the same as the number of years with very high ice cover. Take a look at the following chart, utilizing data from NOAA’s animation. Years in bold were either extremely low, or high, depending on the column.

LOW ICE COVER
(near 25%)
HIGH ICE COVER
(near 100%)
1983 1977
1987 1978
1998 1979
1999 1994
2002 1996
2006 2014
2012 2015

If you would like to see historic ice cover conditions for yourself, a link to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s animated graphic is provided above.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Wetlands Science Conference – February 21/22

Pickerel Weed
Pickerel Weed grows in wetlands across eastern North America.

Wetlands are a rare Lake Superior commodity, especially on the Canadian side. Wetlands are important because of their rich diversity of species and productivity. A wide array of-plants, animals, fish and other aquatic organisms, thrive in wetlands, which also provide valuable nursery habitat for all of the preceding.

The Wisconsin Wetlands Association will be hosting their 2018 Wetland Science Conference, entitled “Wetland Resilience” on February 21st and 22nd in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin.

Conference organizers recently announced their conference program which includes the following elements:

Conference Keynote: Resiliency for Wetlands and Communities: Notes from the Field
Gillian Davies, Senior Ecological Scientist, BSC Group, Inc., and Past President, Society for Wetland Scientists

Plenary Address: Climate Change and Waters of Wisconsin: An Update
John Magnuson, Emeritus Professor and Emeritus Director, UW-Madison Center for Limnology

  • Hydrology & Geomorphology
  • Long Term Restoration and Management
  • Wetland Wildlife
  • Wetland Flora and Plant Life
  • Aquatic Plant Identification Workshop.

Field Trips Include:

  • Connecting People to Nature: Wildlife and Habitat Recovery at UW-Waukesha Field Station
  • Wetlands in Winter: Scuppernong River Habitat Area.

According to the conference website, the annual Wetland Science Conference is, “a 2-day conference where scientists, practitioners, government officials, enthusiasts and others gather to share the latest wetland science and solutions. ”

The site points out that the conference is, “a program of Wisconsin Wetlands Association. WWA is dedicated to the protection, restoration, and enjoyment of wetlands and associated ecosystems through science-based programs, education, and advocacy”.

 

 

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPrint this pageEmail this to someone